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Quisqueya Henriquez

Locus

This play is a reflection on the (im)possibility of accepting diversity and the other. The fragmented body of the neoplasm—the fruit of unstable conditions—overcomes barriers, loves and denies itself and others, wanders around, forgetting its profession. It frequently and with pleasure divides, goes through dangerous palpation, questions the possibility of contact with the experience of the other. Poorly brought up but very successful, it invites us to a trans-species transition.

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Cuban-born, Henriquez examines the environment and place with Locus. The masked, detailed photographs of sites, objects, symbols, and close-ups of body parts function like views through windows and recollections of places and things. The shaped rubber arrangements on the floor create points for three viewers to interact in relation to each other with the correlating photographs on the walls. A narrative can be drawn from identifying with the images and giving form to the displaced images, images that no longer exist or are not temporally tied. This three-way communication completes the installation, playfully referring back to the human bodies that live through the experiences.

Henriquez had originally planned to make the shapes on the floor out of plywood but found that the old wooden floor of the building was too uneven for a rigid form. After exploring various replacement materials, like heavy felt and other flooring materials, the staff of the Mattress Factory and the artist discovered the heavy rubber materials at a Pittsburgh gasket manufacturer. She had intended to hand-cut all the pieces, but the manufacturer was able to die-cut them so that they were identical and fit together seamlessly. Henriquez used a blueprint machine to plot and scale one section of the triform from her original drawing. She did not decide on their final shape until after she had seen the space.

When

1998

About The Artist

Quisqueya Henriquez was born in 1966 in Havana, Cuba. Henriquez is associated with the Cuban avant-garde generation of the 1980s. She was educated at the Universidad Autonoma de Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, and Instituto Superior de Arte, Havana, Cuba. As an artist who has moved to different countries, language has become an important subject in her work. Her installations are created out of minimalist-style industrial materials that paradoxically are rich with layers of meaning. She resides in the Dominican Republic.

Cuban-born, Henriquez examines the environment and place with Locus. The masked, detailed photographs of sites, objects, symbols, and close-ups of body parts function like views through windows and recollections of places and things. The shaped rubber arrangements on the floor create points for three viewers to interact in relation to each other with the correlating photographs on the walls. A narrative can be drawn from identifying with the images and giving form to the displaced images, images that no longer exist or are not temporally tied. This three-way communication completes the installation, playfully referring back to the human bodies that live through the experiences.

Henriquez had originally planned to make the shapes on the floor out of plywood but found that the old wooden floor of the building was too uneven for a rigid form. After exploring various replacement materials, like heavy felt and other flooring materials, the staff of the Mattress Factory and the artist discovered the heavy rubber materials at a Pittsburgh gasket manufacturer. She had intended to hand-cut all the pieces, but the manufacturer was able to die-cut them so that they were identical and fit together seamlessly. Henriquez used a blueprint machine to plot and scale one section of the triform from her original drawing. She did not decide on their final shape until after she had seen the space.

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